Sexuality Education: 6 proactive tips for concerned parents

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Sexuality education is an ever-present problem for concerned parents.  The growing tsunami of progressive sexual attitudes heightens the natural desire to protect our children’s innocence.  With so much happening, and very quickly, it can be difficult to know how to embrace the role and duty as primary educators of our children.

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As evidenced in the updated Relationships and Sexuality Education Guidelines (2020), there is an agenda being implemented which is accelerating at lightning speed.  It’s an agenda that wants to destroy all that is true, good and beautiful about friendships, sexuality, marriage, family, replacing them with a distorted, inverted notion of freedom.

Our children depend on us to protect them, and to help them grow in virtue.  One day we will have to stand and account for all that we have done, or failed to do in our roles as parents.

Proactive tips for when you face a progressive agenda in your child’s school

1. Consider Home Education

Seriously consider home education.  It is in the only option where you, as the parent or caregiver, can determine what your child is exposed to.  In the home, you are able to pass on Christian values, and help your children grow in the virtues, so that when faced with temptations, they will be more likely to make good decisions.

In New Zealand, an exemption certificate is required from the Ministry of Education.  The certificate is relatively easy to obtain.  Existing home schoolers are always willing to help out with applications.  A supervisor’s allowance is granted twice a year which can assist with curriculum and resource purchases.

There are many opportunities for home schooled families to meet, play, and learn together.  Schedules can work around family commitments and work requirements.  There are many options for secondary students to acquire qualifications, and if they wish, gain entry to university.

However, home education, for many different reasons, is not for everyone.  So, what can you do when you have no other options than to send your children to school?

2. Choose a school that aligns best with your values

Choosing a school that aligns with your values is getting increasingly difficult to do.  All State and State-integrated schools are required to follow the New Zealand Curriculum, as well as any published Guidelines.

The newly released Relationships and Sexuality Guidelines from the Ministry of Education, is designed to be implemented with a whole-school approach, in every school community in New Zealand.  This means implementing gender inclusive policies and procedures school-wide (such as permitting biological boys to share the same toilets and changing rooms as girls).

The purpose of this programme is to groom young children into accepting a worldview that embraces homosexuality and transgenderism as normal. 

Schools which successfully resist this progressive agenda will be few. 

There are many good teachers, and other staff, in New Zealand schools.  Many teachers have a real love for education and care for their students.  These teachers need our support as they face increasing pressures to conform to the current narrative.  Those who are vocal, will in time, find they have nowhere to go.

3. Find out what your children are being taught

You have a right to know what your children are being taught at school.  It is imperative that you do all you can to ensure you know what your child is being taught across the curriculum

In his book, The Facts of Life, life and family researcher, Dr. Brian Clowes observes “the brutal truth is evident:  parents who do not inform themselves very carefully about the sex education their children are getting are, by default, letting their children adopt the values of strangers.  They are letting their children stroll into a sexual minefield without the necessary guidance of moral standards.”

Make sure you are not one of these parents. Here are some ways you can inform yourself.

  • Discuss the programme with your child’s teacher, or with the Head of Department.  Keep asking, even if you are given scant information or stonewalled.
  • Schools are required to consult with their community about sexuality programmes.  Make sure you have your say if/when you are given the opportunity.
  • Ask to see the materials being used in the classroom – worksheets, videos, music, and other resources.
  • Go along to any parent evenings the school may have and ask questions until you are satisfied.
  • Find out what other programmes and learning objectives are being taught in the school or classroom outside of the Health curriculum.
  • Read the school’s policies on the use of toilets, and changing rooms. 
  • Ask about bullying policies and procedures.
  • Find out what “support groups” exist within the school, and what their activities are.
  • Look into the organisations the school invites for lunchtime workshops, or other special events.

If you are having difficulty finding all the information you require, make an appointment with the principal.  Be respectful, but firm in your resolve to get to the bottom of what is happening in your school community.

If you are still not satisfied with the school’s approach, or their lack of co-operation in sharing information with you, go to the Board of Trustees.  The school has a duty to listen to you.

For those whose children attend Catholic Schools, your last resort is the Bishop.

4. Find like-minded parents in the school and band together

If you are feeling uneasy, there will be other parents in the school who feel the same way.  Find these parents!  Work together on the above points.  Together, you will be a strong voice of advocacy for your children.

5. Remove your child from class

When sexuality is the upcoming topic in Health, parents should receive communication from the school informing them of this.  You have a right to ask in writing for your child to be removed from the class and supervised elsewhere during that time.

Parents may experience some backlash if they ask to have their child removed from other subjects which are covering material contrary to their values.

It is important to realise that sexuality education is not just going to occur in Health class. As the Relationships and Sexuality Guidelines impress, the goal is to permeate the whole school community with alternative lifestyles contrary to Christian morality, or even conventions once accepted and upheld by secular civil societies. 

6. Communicate with your child

Talk to your child about everything.  Let them know that you are there for them, that you love them, and make sure they know they can tell you anything.

Ensure your children know you will not over-react if they share behaviours you might be disappointed in.

Lovingly guide them in truth.

Know who their friends are, and have them over.  Don’t be afraid to tell them that certain friends are not good for them.  Set firm boundaries around friendships and activities.

Establish a relationship of trust.

Conclusion

Sexuality education is an ever-present problem for concerned parents.  However, fighting the growing tsunami of progressive agendas, and protecting your child’s innocence is possible.

Do not be afraid.  You know what is best for your children.  Be confident.  Hold your head high and fight for truth.  Fight for their purity. Their futures and the future of civilisation depends on your willingness to stand up.

Find out more about the Relationships and Sexuality Guidelines here.

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